Commercial wireless versus standard stationary EEG systems for personalized emotional brain-computer interfaces: a preliminary reliability check

Authors

  • Derrick Matthew Buchanan (1) Neuroscience of Imagination Cognition Emotion Research Laboratory, Ontario, Canada. (2) Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ontario, Canada.
  • Jeremy Grant (1) Neuroscience of Imagination Cognition Emotion Research Laboratory, Ontario, Canada. (2) Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ontario, Canada.
  • Amedeo D'Angiulli (1) Neuroscience of Imagination Cognition Emotion Research Laboratory, Ontario, Canada. (2) Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ontario, Canada.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.31117/neuroscirn.v2i1.21

Keywords:

arousal, valence, brain-computer interfaces, EEG, wireless

Abstract

We present a preliminary data-based assessment of measurement reliability of the commercial 14-electrode Emotiv EPOCTMEEG wireless system in distinguishing between electrophysiological states of emotional function, as compared to a standard research-lab stationary 32-electrode EEG system for personalized single-individual use.  Individual observers completed two tasks designed to elicit neural changes in emotional arousal and valence while simultaneously recording their EEGs with both systems in separate sessions. Participants observed emotion-laden words from the ANEW database and images from the IAPS database, both widely used and validated databases for emotional processes in multidisciplinary research. The pattern of results distinguished between high and low arousal and valence states using the stationary traditional system, but not the commercial device. Also, the latter device recorded EEG band frequencies at a much lower resolution and frequency range than the standard system. These findings suggest poor validity when using the commercial device and therefore should be cautioned against in a research setting.

Published

2019-03-11

How to Cite

Buchanan, D. M., Grant, J. and D’Angiulli, A. (2019) “Commercial wireless versus standard stationary EEG systems for personalized emotional brain-computer interfaces: a preliminary reliability check”, Neuroscience Research Notes, 2(1), pp. 7-15. doi: 10.31117/neuroscirn.v2i1.21.

Issue

Section

Research Notes