Cellular function of satellite cells does not play a role in muscle weakness of adult Ts1Cje mice

  • Chai Ling Lim Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
  • Usman Bala Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
  • Melody Pui-Yee Leong Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
  • Johnson Stanslas Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
  • Rajesh Ramasamy Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
  • King-Hwa Ling Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
  • Pike-See Cheah Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
Keywords: Down syndrome, skeletal muscle, stem cells, muscle weakness, satellite cells

Abstract

Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic condition resulting from triplication of human chromosome (HSA)21. Besides intellectual disability, DS is frequently associated with hypotonia. Satellite cells are the resident cells that provides robust and remarkable regenerative capacity to the skeletal muscles, and its population size has been reported to be disease-associated.  However, little is known about the population size of satellite cells in DS and the association of its intrinsic cellular functionality and hypotonia seen in DS. Here, we studied the Ts1Cje mouse, a DS murine model displays the muscle weakness characteristic. Satellite cell populations were immunostained with Pax7 and myonuclei numbers in the Ts1Cje extensor digitorum longus muscle were assessed. Their cellular function was further determined via in vitro assay in high-serum conditioned medium. Subsequently, the in vitro self-renewal, proliferative, and differentiation activities of these myogenic precursor cells were assessed after 24, 48, and 72h using Pax7, MyoD, and Ki67 immunomarkers. Our results showed that the population and functionality of Ts1Cje satellite cell did not differ significantly when compared to the wildtype cells isolated from disomic littermates. In conclusion, our findings indicate that intrinsic cellular functionality of the satellite cells, do not contribute to muscle weakness in Ts1Cje mouse.

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Published
2018-05-15
How to Cite
Lim, C. L., Bala, U., Leong, M. P.-Y., Stanslas, J., Ramasamy, R., Ling, K.-H. and Cheah, P.-S. (2018) “Cellular function of satellite cells does not play a role in muscle weakness of adult Ts1Cje mice”, Neuroscience Research Notes, 1(1), pp. 3-10. doi: 10.31117/neuroscirn.v1i1.6.
Section
Research Notes